Thursday, February 6, 2020

A critical commentary on 'The Village Schoolmaster' by O. Goldsmith Essay

A critical commentary on 'The Village Schoolmaster' by O. Goldsmith - Essay Example While poetry, like literature, can be used for a variety of purposes, poetry such as that created by Oliver Goldsmith in his poem â€Å"The Village Schoolmaster† concentrates on illustrating a specific emotion. This is made explicitly apparent when one takes the work within its original context as a portion of a much longer work entitled â€Å"The Deserted Village.† According to an article posted by the University of Buckingham (â€Å"The Village Schoolteacher†, 2007), this longer work painted a picture of what is believed to be an amalgamation of a variety of small villages Goldsmith remembered, presenting a single image of a deserted town left behind as the result of privatization and loss of their lands. This longer work illustrates the importance of the fence mentioned in the first line of â€Å"The Village Schoolmaster† as newly privatized land was ‘enclosed’ in the name of progress: â€Å"what Goldsmith thought was going on is clear fro m what he says elsewhere in the poem: ‘Those fenceless fields the sons of wealth divide’ (307)† (â€Å"The Village Schoolmaster†, 2007). Regardless of whether one is familiar with the longer work from which this poem is taken, Goldsmith’s poem â€Å"The Village Schoolmaster† evokes the same sense of sad nostalgia for something lost forever within itself through Goldsmith’s mastery of imagery, meter, rhyme, lexicon and implied meaning. Goldsmith employs imagery within the very first lines of his poem to help set up the scene he wishes to invoke: â€Å"Beside yon straggling fence that skirts the way / With Blossom’d furze unprofitably gay† (1-2). The fence is further ahead, indicating a division between the land upon which the speaker is standing and the land upon which the deserted village still stands. That it is deserted is indicated by the overwhelming blossoming furze which is unprofitable because no one is left to enjoy it. However, it continues to

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

White People and American Citizen Essay Example for Free

White People and American Citizen Essay The short story â€Å" How it Feels to be Colored Me† was written in year 1928 by Zora Neale Hurston who grew up in Eatonville, Florida. Zora grew up in an predominantly all black town. She had begun to realize the differences between blacks and whites at the beginning of her teens. Zora only had contact with the white people who passed through her town. These people who passed through Eatonville, Florida usually were going to Orlando or coming from Orlando, Florida. I believe the main reason why the story was written was to focus on the differences between black and white people. The short story â€Å" How it Feels to be Colored Me† was written in year 1928 by Zora Neale Hurston who grew up in Eatonville, Florida. Zora grew up in an predominantly all black town. She had begun to realize the differences between blacks and whites at the beginning of her teens. Zora only had contact with the white people who passed through her town. These people who passed through Eatonville, Florida usually were going to Orlando or coming from Orlando, Florida. I believe the main reason why the story was written was to focus on the differences between black and white people. When Zora Hurston states â€Å" I have no separate feeling about being an American citizen and colored. I am merely a fragment of the Great Soul that surges within the boundaries. My country, right or wrong. † I believe she’s describing her feelings of being an American citizen and being colored. She does not have separate feelings of either. Zora seems to accept her identity for being colored and an American citizen. I think Zora is trying to achieve dignity/pride in America as an American. Zora doesn’t want to harp on the past Nor does she want the actions of others to affect her. Zora believes that she is an American citizen whether she’s black or white and everyone has the same rights. How It Feels to Be Colored Me Analysis by Terissa7.    N. p. , n. d. Web. 15 June 2014. . â€Å"How it Feels to Be Colored† The short story â€Å" How it Feels to be Colored Me† was written in year 1928 by Zora Neale Hurston who grew up in Eatonville, Florida. Zora grew up in an predominantly all black town. She had begun to realize the differences between blacks and whites at the beginning of her teens. Zora only had contact with the white people who passed through her town. These people who passed through Eatonville, Florida usually were going to Orlando or coming from Orlando, Florida. I believe the main reason why the story was written was to focus on the differences between black and white people. When Zora Hurston states â€Å" I have no separate feeling about being an American citizen and colored. I am merely a fragment of the Great Soul that surges within the boundaries. My country, right or wrong. † I believe she’s describing her feelings of being an American citizen and being colored. She does not have separate feelings of either. Zora seems to accept her identity for being colored and an American citizen. I think Zora is trying to achieve dignity/pride in America as an American. Zora doesn’t want to harp on the past Nor does she want the actions of others to affect her. Zora believes that she is an American citizen whether she’s black or white and everyone has the same rights. How It Feels to Be Colored Me Analysis by Terissa7.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Pollution :: essays research papers

Pollution   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  People have long used the sea as a dump for our wastes. Most of the pollution dumped into the ocean comes from human activities on land. Marine pollution is defined as the introduction into the ocean by humans of substance or energy that changes the quality of the water or affects the physical, chemical, or biological environment.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  There are different types of pollution. One of them is natural pollutants. An example would be a volcanic eruption which can produce immense quantities of carbon dioxide, methane, sulfur compounds, and oxides of nitrogen. Excess amounts of these substances produced by human activity may cause global warming and acid rain. No one is sure to what extent we have contaminated the ocean. By the time the first oceanographers began widespread testing, the Industrial Revolution was well underway and changes had already occurred. Traces of synthetic compounds have now found their way into every oceanic corner. Pollutants cause damage by interfering directly or indirectly with the biochemical processes of an organism. Some pollution-induced changes may be instantly lethal; other changes may weaken an organism over weeks or months, alter the dynamics of the population of which it is a part, or gradually unbalance the entire community. Oil is a natural part of the marine environment. Oil seeps have been leaking large quantities of oil into the ocean for millions of years. The amount of oil entering the ocean has increased greatly in recent years, however, because of our growing dependence on marine transportation for petroleum products, offshore drilling, near shore refining, and street runoff carrying waste oil from automobiles. Oil reaches the ocean in runoff from streets or as waste oil poured down drains, into dirt, in trash destined for a landfill. Every year more than 908 million liters of used motor oil finds its way into the ocean. Motor oil that has been used is more toxic than crude oil or new oil because it has developed carcinogenic and metallic components from the heat and pressure within internal combustion engines. Spills of crude oil are generally larger in volume and more frequent than spills of refined oil. Most components of crude oil do not dissolve easily in water, but those that do can harm the delicate juvenile forms of marine organisms even in minute concentrations. The remaining insoluble components from sticky layers on the surface that prevent free diffusion of gases, clog adult organisms feeding structures, kill larvae, and decrease the sunlight available for photosynthesis.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

School Uniforms Debate

The utilization of school uniforms is a subject of sizzling debate among parents and school authorities since long. Some dispute the advantages of school uniforms, while others consider that the shortcomings are far more abundant. In our contemporary world, children have become much more conscious of their clothes and appearance. This basically echoes our contemporary ideals and the concentration of adults in garments. Kids can, nonetheless, without some of the reasonable influences that come with age and understanding, become much more fanatical with clothes and latest fashion trends.Children who come to school in old-fashioned attire can be mocked at, become a laughing stock or even tormented. The expense of those clothing and clashes connected with them leads many schools and parents to review the school uniform. Parents' Stance Few countries, on the other hand, are starting to overturn the decline in uniform usage. While schools in other countries are starting to pioneer uniforms for the first time. This is very contradictory topic, as elder students normally condemn the concept of uniform.Some parents also see an obligatory uniform as pushy and a violation of their fundamental liberty. Students' Stance Many students believe they lose their individuality when it is mandatory for everyone to wear the same clothing to schools. Others think a school uniform brings equality amongst students. Many teachers and school authorities consider a school uniform or a uniform dress code as a way to inculcate a sense of regulation in the classes as well as an environment of education and learning. So, what is your stance regarding the uniform debate?Here are some pros and cons to help get you started! Reasons in Favor of Wearing School Uniforms It takes away the feeling of envy between peers. It helps decrease obedience trouble. A uniform assists the students achieve academically better. Students focus more on their education rather than on deciding what to wear. Besides eliminating distraction, uniforms force students to take school atmosphere more critically. Kids tend to be misapprehended and mocked by peers due to the type of garments they might wear. Consequently, uniforms decrease social clashes and violence in the schools.One of the most insightful advantages of having schools uniforms is that they are extremely cost effectual and alleviate the parents from the trouble of purchasing trendy and costly garments frequently. Reasons Against Wearing School Uniforms It subtracts students' liberty to take decisions. It doesn't let students feel distinctive and unique. School uniforms hinder the need for the self expression of a kid. Sociologists claim that it may cause unsuitable ways of expression by kids, such as offensive usage of makeup and jewelry.Uniforms take away children's identity. The pressure on a uniform dress code in school counters the spirit of unity in diversity and its merriment. It is even believed to confine socialization, an imp erative feature of human nature. In contrast to civil dress, school uniforms prove to be ineffectual and futile once the kid is out of school. Another bad consequence of school uniform is that it denies the children the ease, which one feels on wearing different kinds of garments, as per personal preference.This uneasiness might unfavorably reflect upon the academic performance of the kid. Do uniforms breach liberty of expression prospects? We believe that this dispute is quite frail. Students are liberated to dress as they and their parents decide during extracurricular hours. They also need to understand that dress codes and uniforms are an authenticity of a place of work in the grown-up world including in professional offices, delivery services, and retail and food stores, administration offices and so on.Since many years parents, teachers, school authorities, and students have squabbled over the pros, cons, and advantages of school uniform policies. A socially connected pro is t hat it places everyone on a rank ground in connection to socioeconomic grade. When kids get their preference of school clothing based on how much wealth their parents make, it causes self-esteem concerns. If all kids have to wear the identical outfit in school then it's not as evident as to whose family can have enough money to afford Mango and who can only pay for cheap stuff from Wal-Mart.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

An Overview of Postmodernism Essay - 2180 Words

The political climate at the beginning of the 1940’s and the changes taking place all around the world drastically influenced the face of contemporary society. The invasion of Poland by Germany on 1st of September 1939 was the first stone thrown in the face of freedom of expression and liberty out of the many that followed for the next decades. The dawn of the Second World War was one of the premises that forced many European artists, pioneers par excellence in their field, through their French or German inherited status, to immigrate across the ocean. Due to the exile, the art centre also moved overseas, from Paris to New York, offering a new opportunity for American art to be the initiator in what was generally accepted as the new†¦show more content†¦This description is trying to clearly position postmodernism in a specific time frame and outline its main characteristics. However, when consulting the Macmillan Dictionary (2010) the description offered is significa ntly less conclusive: â€Å"ideas, attitudes, or styles of art, literature, or thinking that have developed after modernism, often as a reaction against † The main accent is set on the chronological aspect of postmodernism and its logical and historical flow offering the reader not enough information to identify a clear period or any particular feature. Only by comparing the two definitions, a very small part of the available explanations on the subject, and at the same time reading them together one can identify one of the main components of the movement: diversity in all its aspects. The difference in these definitions is not just a simple coincidence and should be taken as a figure of speech for the description of the entire period. During this time critics and writers, artists and architects etc. have tried to find a proper explanation for the changes they were being part of, concretised in what became known as Postmodernism. During the 1960s ‘attacks’ started appearing against the elitism shown by modernism. One of the first voices pointing at modernism’s faults was the poet Karl Shapiro , who in 1959 in an article for The Times BookShow MoreRelatedThe Apologetics Application Paper Instructions1329 Words   |  6 Pagesspace below, provide the information indicated. 1. Worldview Selection Of the 3 choices listed in the Apologetics Application Paper Instructions, which worldview will you write about in this paper? 1. Worldview selected: Postmodernism 2. Summary of Significant Beliefs of the Worldview In Chapter 4 of Groothuis’s Christian Apologetics, he describes the Christian worldview using several major categories of belief. For this section of your paper, you will describe the worldviewRead MorePersonal Worldview Inventory : Worldview1164 Words   |  5 PagesPersonal Worldview Inventory Worldview is regarded as the crucial basis of reality and is dominant among culture. It consists of classes, norms as well as values that provide an overview by which is observed as an overview that people use to examine the universe. As a result of unique wide perspective associated with worldview that everybody has, there are evidences of similarities within communities, family setups and among the culture. (Shelly, 2006). Worldview can also be influenced by the spiritualRead MoreThe Third Policeman: A Lesson in Absurdity Essay1571 Words   |  7 Pagesunderstand. O’Brien asks the reader to suspend disbelief and follow along for the ride. O’Brien pushes the boundaries of postmodernism novel and the limits of the conscious mind while dabbling with impossibilities and possibilities of the existentialist mind. Flann O’Brien weaves together elements of existentialism, Freud’s psychological theory of consciousness, and postmodernism in literature in a satiri cal way to demonstrate how little humans actually know; especially during a time when new theoriesRead MoreSamuel Becket s Waiting On Godot1861 Words   |  8 Pagesfootnotes, some of which have footnotes within themselves. In this paper these three books will be discussed in detail and, through the review, the characteristics of postmodernism will be identified. Additionally, how the writing form came into existence, why people use postmodernism , what events influenced its creation, and what postmodernism conveys about people will also be discussed. The postmodern genre is best summarized as weird. The only rule is that there are no rules, which means most postmodernRead MoreRight After The Fun Relaxing 1960’S And Excitement Of The1229 Words   |  5 Pagesbuilding is a mix of brutalist and postmodernist style with a concrete structure and â€Å"camp† value. Postmodernism gained traction during the 1970’s because its main goal was to go against modernism in anyway that it could. Modernism symbolized the broken trust, economics, and values of the past towards youth during this time and they took any approach to distance themselves from that. Postmodernism expanded around all different art forms and thus had many characteristics furthering symbolizing theRead More The Transition to Postmodernism Essay3040 Words   |  13 PagesThe Transition to Postmodernism Works Cited Not Included Postmodernism is a difficult term to define, as it is evident in many different disciplines, such as art, literature, architecture, technology, and, the precise emerging moment of this movement is also hard to identify. In order to truly understand `Postmodernism, one must first identify with `Modernism and its subsequent decline which led to the appearance of the Post-modern ear. It is often suggested that Postmodernity is simply aRead MoreArt Essay 21433 Words   |  6 Pagesaims to puzzle his audience with his geometric artworks such as ‘Leviathan’. Approaches to this question varied, with perspectives ranging from critical and historical overviews of the 20th century and more contemporary accounts of practice. Many responses identified Duchamp as pivotal in the development of postmodernism, and presented in-depth discussions of contemporary examples linking traditional ideas to support their case. Responses evidenced a strong understanding of the conceptual frameworkRead MoreThe Tourist Gaze Review.=1762 Words   |  8 Pagesa book on postmodernism, the English is readable). Urry remarks that to be a tourist is one of the characteristics of the â€Å"modern† experience, an idea discussed in more detail by MacCannell(l976). Modernism and postmodernism, by definition, imply rapidly perishable perspectives. Therefore, with 15 years elapsed since the appearance of MacCannell’s now classic study, Urry’s book offers a fresh discussion on the ever-evolving links between tourism and modernism/postmodernism. Urry has identifiedRead More`` Alone Together `` By Sherry Turkle1997 Words   |  8 PagesTogether† by Sherry Turkle can be explained by using the postmodernism theory. There are examples used throughout the entirety of the book that the author herself experienced during interviews that clearly show how our society is evolving in these postmodern times. â€Å"Alone Together† goes into detail explaining how people today are interacting with technology and how it is greatly changing our society. Theory Overview Before explaining postmodernism, modernism needs to explained some first. Modernism believesRead MoreEssay on Social Construction of Child and Childhood1406 Words   |  6 PagesSocial construction of child and childhood To start with an overview of social constructionism in very general terms leads to build understandings of child and childhood in a social world more explicitly. Notion of social construction is defined in diverse disciplines and instead of generating a description there are a number of thoughts. â€Å"It is sometimes called a movement, at other times a position, a theory, a theoretical orientation, an approach; psychologists remain unsure of its status (Stam

Friday, December 27, 2019

The Law And Order And The Trials Of The 17th Century Essay

Astonishingly, the striking differences between today’s law and order and the trials of the 17th century are expansive and extensive. If a judge today were to sentence a defendant to a death sentence based solely on intangible, baseless evidence taken from only unfounded accusations, the world would be in a riot. And yet, this was common practice in the 1600’s, where DNA and fingerprints were not of investigative use yet, and all judges had to go on was he-said-she-said. A jury of supposedly law-upholding, learned citizens found someone as innocent, pure, and warm as Rebecca Nurse to be not only guilty, but sentenced her to hanging for the heinous crimes of witchcraft that she certainly never committed. More importantly, Nurse’s hanging brought serious doubts through some of the judges and began the momentum needed to change and disrupt the way the entire town thought of and treated witch trials and those accused. Rebecca Nurse almost managed to get out of this h orrendous situation with no repercussions, but the judges expressed their opinions thoroughly to the jurors that they should seriously reconsider their innocent verdict. Mainly due to the public’s request and the resumed fits of the girls, the jury did reconsider, and she was sentenced to death by hanging on July 19th, 1662. She even received one last chance to achieved innocence, when the governor of Massachusetts, William Phips, declared a pardon for her, but the girls were outraged and Phips was forced to extractShow MoreRelatedA New World Developed Between The 16th And 18th Century1318 Words   |  6 Pages A new world developed between the 16th and 18th century focused on growing empires establishments of ‘power and profit’. Ogborn argues that through various types of global connections and the rise and fall of global powers, a global history was created. In particular, the exchange of goods and services by Britain and the English colonies was only obtain able through utilizing transportation. As a result, an advantageous Atlantic economy was formed . Britain applied transportation as a method ofRead More17th century women experiences Essay1436 Words   |  6 PagesThough women were subordinates by both the eye of the church and the government, women found ways to express authority both intentionally and unintentionally. Women began to act independently in patriarchal society. In 17th century Euro-America Puritan society believed that men played a patriarchal role upon women, and that this role was instituted by God and nature. The seniority of men over women lay within both the household and the public sphere. The household, immediate family living in theRead MoreAnne Hutchinson: An Activist for Equal Rights and a Pioneer of Suffrage1294 Words   |  6 Pagesheld on the idea that their lives have been planned out by God from birth and any disruption to that plan should be eradicated. During the 17th century, witch hunts occurre d due in part to Puritan’s stringent religious way of life. The controversy between John Winthrop and Anne Hutchinson rose up out of sexism, pose of threat and flawed theory in the form of a trial against Hutchinson. Winthrop and Hutchinson’s personalities clashed immediately. They were neighbors in Boston and disliked each otherRead MoreEuropean Witch Hunt Essay897 Words   |  4 Pageshunts spanning from 1450 to 1750 is demonstrative of the socioeconomic, religious, and cultural changes that were occurring within a population that was unprepared for the reconstruction of society. Though numerous conclusions concerning the witch trials, why they occurred, and who was prosecuted have been founded within agreement there remains interpretations that expand on the central beliefs. Through examining multiple arguments a greater understanding of this period can be observed as there remainsRead MoreThe Legacy Of The Magna Carta994 Words   |  4 Pagestaxing the people as often as he pleased, and required him to get a consent before doing so. It also made the law applicable to everyone including the king, and took away the king s power to be the judge on any trials. From the 13th to early 17th century, the English had established a form of government that combined the power of the people to that of the monarch. However, by early 17th century, after the death of queen Elizabeth I, a new scottish king was appointed to rule over England. King CharlesRead More Witch Trial Phenomena Essay1648 Words   |  7 Pagesuntil the practice of magic became a religious warfare between God and his enemy the devil did community concerns about the practice of magic evolve into the desperate, sadistic trials that occurred in the 16th and 17th centuries, and the idea that witchcraft was a reality rather than a myth suddenly made a comeback. Trials of individual witches in early modern Europe always began with specific accusations brought against a supposed witch by one or more of her neighbours. When the printing pressRead MoreThe Trial Of Tempel Anneke : Records Of Witchcraft Trials1621 Words   |  7 Pagesto multiple laws being passed in regards to witchcraft. Torture was allowed and women and children were called to testify in the court room. Individuals who were seen to be outcasts on the outer edge of society were immediately targeted and easily suspected of sorcery. The Trial of Tempel Anneke: Records of Witchcraft Trial in Brunswick, Germany, 1663 gives its readers an inside perspective of the many different attitudes that existed towards witchcraft at the time. Because 17th century Brunswick townspeopleRead More Comparison Between The Crucible by Arthur Miller and Vinegar Tom by C. Churchill627 Words   |  3 PagesMassachusetts USA in 1692. Vinegar Tom was written in the 1970s and was set in the 17th century. Although Vinegar Tom was written about the 17th century, the ideas parallel those of the issues of the 1970s. The issue was feminism. Although women were beginning to work the same jobs as men, their wages were drastically different, with men being paid a lot more for the same job. More women started to go to university in order to gain the qualifications that would enable them to do the jobs that men Read MoreCreationism vs. Evolution Essay1170 Words   |  5 PagesSince the Age of the Enlightenment, the institution of religion has had to contend with the opposition of science regarding the issues of the origins of the world and of the human species. Up until around the end of the 17th century, the church was the authority on how the world and everything in it had come to be. However, with the great intellectual revolution came thinkers such as Galileo, Copernicus, Bacon, Descartes, and many others who challenged the biblical assumptions with empiricallyRead MoreWitchcraft in the 16th Century Essay2032 Words   |  9 PagesThe origins of 16th century witchcraft were changing social, economic and religious conditions in Europe and America. The desire to find a scapegoat for the change resulted in a genocide known as the Burning Times that lasted more than a century. †¨Ã¢â‚¬ ¨Witches were accused of cas ting spells on unfortunate victims and were often sentenced to death by hanging, drowning or by being burned to death. History of The persecution of people practicing witchcraft in the 16th century began in England in 1589

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Essay on Alcoholics Anonymous 12-Step Program - 2169 Words

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the largest and most commonly known self-help group in the world. Since the creation of AA in 1935, there have been many programs modeled after it, which are also based on the 12-Step Program. Some of these include Narcotics Anonymous (NA) and Chemically Dependent Anonymous, as well as programs for specific drugs, such as Cocaine Anonymous (CA) and Crystal Meth Anonymous (NIDA, 2012). Attendance and participation for self-help groups are open for anyone to attend and free of cost for all members, with meetings typically held in locations such as churches and public buildings. â€Å"Metropolitan areas usually have specialized groups, based on such member characteristics as gender, length of time in recovery,†¦show more content†¦When an individual believes, and expects, to have positive effects from a certain drug (e.g., drinking alcohol to reduce stress and anxiety), the likelihood that the individual will abuse the drug is extremely high. Sociocultural factors also play a vital role in how frequently a substance is used, with family and friends being the most influential. A broken family home (e.g., marital problems, parent/sibling alcohol or drug use, and legal or psychiatric problems) can have a tremendous negative effect on a child and the decisions they make. A lack of emotional support from parents is found to increase drug use, whereas the lack of parental monitoring if often associated with higher drug use (Kring, 2014). The idea of being â€Å"popular† and having a ton of friends seems to be a common goal for the majority of adolescents and young adults. Social influence is explained by the fact that having peers who drink, influences drinking behavior; however, it is also known that individuals will choose friends with drinking patterns similar to their own. While growing up, most of us have always been told to choose our friends wisely; however, they neglected to tell us how difficult this can b e. The 12-Step program addresses the factors or causes that are responsible for, or related to, substance abuse by helping individuals to understand the concept of change. â€Å"Processes of change are the covert and overt activities that people engage in to alter affect, thinking,Show MoreRelatedThe 12 Step Program Alcoholics Anonymous3302 Words   |  14 Pages The 12 step program Alcoholics Anonymous (AA )was born in 1934. Prohibition had been repealed and a man named Bill Watson drunkenly found his way to Manhattan Hospital. Bill was known to knock back quite a bit of whiskey every day and couldn t seem to be able to quit. While he was at Manhattan Hospital he was given a new and considered experimental treatment for addiction of belladonna, which is a hallucinogen. Bill in his induced state yelled to God to help free him of alcohol. He reportedRead MoreThe 12 Step Program Alcoholics Anonymous3299 Words   |  14 Pages The 12 step program Alcoholics Anonymous (AA )wa s born in 1934. Prohibition had been repealed and a man named Bill Watson drunkenly found his way to Manhattan Hospital. Bill was known to knock back quite a bit of whiskey every day and couldn t seem to be able to quit. While he was in Manhattan Hospital he was given a new and considered experimental treatment for addiction of belladonna, which is a hallucinogen. Bill in his induced state, yelled to God to help free him of alcohol. He reportedRead MoreThe Alcoholics Anonymous 12 Step Recovery Program Guide Alcoholics1611 Words   |  7 PagesRunning head: 12-Step Meeting Reaction Paper 12-Step Meeting Reaction Paper Carissa Hardy ADRE 6703 Abstract The Alcoholics Anonymous 12-Step recovery program guides alcoholics through a series of behavioral, emotional, cognitive, spiritual and social actions towards sobriety and wellness. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, excessive drinking has lead to approximately 88,000 deaths in the United States each year and accounts for 1 in 10 deaths in working ageRead MoreChildhood Alcoholism And The Effect Of The 12 Step Program For Alcoholics Anonymous As A Form Of Treatment1147 Words   |  5 Pagesable to access and get a hold of alcohol more easily than they can other drugs – such as marijuana, heroin, cocaine, etc. The topic and focus of this paper is to explore specifically adolescent alcoholism and the effects of the 12-Step Program used in Alcoholics Anonymous as a form of treatment to overcome this addiction. This treatment will be evaluated through the review of empirical research and an interview with Dr. Don MacDonald, a professor of Marriage and Family Therapy at Seattle PacificRead MoreAlcoholics Anonymous: the 12-Step Treatment780 Words   |  4 PagesAlcoholics Anonymous: The 12-Step Treatment Alcoholics Anonymous: The 12-Step Treatment The 12-step program used by Alcoholics Anonymous is a well-known treatment method that’s used for many types of addiction, not just alcohol. Alcoholics are encouraged to â€Å"work† the 12-steps. The first step involves admitting the powerlessness over alcohol. The second step has the alcoholic believe that there is some type of a greater power working that will help aide the alcoholic to reach sobriety, asRead MoreHistory Of Organization : Alcoholics Anonymous ( A.a )1691 Words   |  7 PagesOrganization Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio, and is a spiritual based organization with the sole purpose â€Å"to stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety† threw fellowship. Alcoholic Anonymous (A.A.) foundation is built on a 12 step program that involves taking 12 step that will guarantee your sobriety (according to A.A.) because you start the 12 steps but you never end, it is designed for you to consistently work the 12 steps for theRead MoreA 12-Step Meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous: A Reaction Paper841 Words   |  3 Pages12-Step Meeting Reaction Paper Objective The objective of this study is to write a reaction on a 12-step meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous with the focus of the meeting being attitude modification. The meeting attended was the Stairway Group meeting in Decatur, Alabama. The members who attended this group meeting were of all ages, of both the female and male gender and were white, black, and Hispanic individuals. The majority of the attendees were males. First Speaker The first speaker at theRead MoreAlcoholics Anonymous : A Anonymous865 Words   |  4 PagesAttending an Alcoholic Anonymous Meeting Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in the basis that alcoholism cannot be healed medically, but spiritually. Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in 1939 by Bill Wilson, and Dr. Robert Smith (B’s, n.d.). The main goal of Alcoholics Anonymous is recovery from alcoholism, and to fully abstain from consuming alcohol. Several non-stated goals are staying out of jail, fixing a financial situation, or becoming happier (Trizio, 2006). After attending in a meeting forRead MoreAlcohol Abuse Is The Most Common Addictive Behavior1295 Words   |  6 PagesMany have tried to guest and speculate that alcohol abuse is due to many factors that include genetics, social, mental and emotional, and even how people around you raised you. Many also have speculated that people that we associates with that are alcoholics can be a factor also. It can be family and friends, schoolmates, and colleagues. Some also say that it can be due to emotional and psychological disorders such as depression, bipolar , or anxiety are factors of someone to drive to drinking to forgetRead MoreA Study On Alcoholics Anonymous Essay1459 Words   |  6 PagesAlcoholics Anonymous has held an almost sacred spot in our society as the way for addicts to get sober through spiritual means, with many people having anecdotal stories and experiences corroborating this belief. To full examine the ethicality of AA, an in depth look at AA is required. A study of its history, a description of the program, the success rates and commonly held harmful beliefs of AA, alternatives to AA, and finally an analysis using Rawl’s Theory of Justice are all required in order